External Adviser Programme

Overview

The External Adviser Program (EAP) gives Yale-NUS students access to advisers and mentors who have a wider range of experience than the CIPE or Yale-NUS faculty can develop internally. You can tap their experience to explore careers, strengthen your network, and sharpen your interpersonal skills.

CIPE recommends that you approach External Advisers just as you would a professional who has no affiliation with the College: keep your communications concise; offer to meet at a time and place that’s convenient for them; propose a short meeting, such as 30 minutes; and complete any preparatory work they suggest. If you have questions about how to conduct informational interviews, ask your CIPE adviser.

Consult our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), below; or email paul.wilt@yale-nus.edu.sg to learn more.

Advisers

  • Bill ANG
    With a background that blends traditional marketing and communications with creative storytelling, Bill Ang has the experience to advise you on how to use your creativity to have personal brand impact.  Read more on LinkedInEmail Bill ANG
  • Andrew JONES
    An executive coach with 26 years of experience in Asia, Andrew Jones can help you develop yourself with awareness, creativity and intent. Read more on LinkedInEmail Andrew JONES
  • Clement ONG
    A certified career and executive coach, Clement Ong can help enhance your self-awareness and clarity about life’s purpose and goals. Read more on LinkedInEmail Clement ONG
  • Shawn RUNACRES
    An entrepreneur with more than 20 years of international experience Shawn Runacres delivers insight on event production, brand management, and internal social development work. Read more on LinkedInEmail Shawn RUNACRES
  • Nick WOOD
    Nick Wood can give you perspectives on how people and companies can create sustainable developments that meet commercial and social needs, especially the management of non-technical risk. Read more on LinkedInEmail Nick WOOD
  • Jonathan KWAN
    With a background in consulting and experience in career advising, Jon Kwan can help you explore your fit and help you prepare for difficult assessments. Read more on LinkedInEmail Jon KWAN
  • Emi EU
    As the director of the Singapore Tyler Print Institute–one of the most cutting-edge destinations for contemporary art in Asia–Emi Eu is positioned to advise on every aspect of the arts, from art history and appreciation to gallery business and international expansion. Read more at STPI’s web siteEmail Paul Wilt for an introduction to Emi EU
  • Alex HOPE
    An executive coach and facilitator, Alex Hope’s rich work experience, cross-cultural attunement and business acumen can give you insights into leadership and management, business development, change, communication skills or team dynamics, and career development. Read more on LinkedIn
  • Yin Cheng LAU
    With 20 years of human resources leadership experience in tech, telecoms, hospitality, start-up, and supply chain management across Asia Pacific, Europe & North America, YC can help you realize your full potential in a Digital Future of Possibilities. Read more on LinkedIn
  • Peter DALGLISH
    With three decades of experience helping marginalized communities in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, Peter Dalglish can help open doors for to contribute to your community. Read more on LinkedIn
  • Vijay DESAI
    A global citizen of the US, Canada, and India, Vijay Desai is an educator and entrepreneur who promotes effective and efficient problem solving, with a focus on success from planning through implementation. Read more on LinkedInEmail Vijay Desai
  • Karthik KARKAL
    With urban design experience in India, the United States, and Singapore, Karthik Karkal can talk to you about how smart collaboration and innovation solve problems on some of the biggest projects humans undertake–the design of their cities. Read more on LinkedInEmail Karthik KARKAL

 

FAQ For Students

Do I need an external adviser?

Although it’s possible to get through life without any advice at all, most people look back on their experiences and remember valuable advice they received from people who’d gone before them. Especially if your interests are specific or unique, the best advice you can get may be outside the walls of the College.

How do I decide which external adviser to approach?

External advisers have different backgrounds and experiences (you can view their profiles via the links above). If an existing member of the panel has experience relevant to your interests, that person would be a good choice. If you are seeking advice in an area where no member of the panel has experience, you can also approach your CIPE adviser with ideas about how to expand the panel in directions that meet student interests.

How do I approach an adviser for a first meeting?

External Advisers are not paid by Yale-NUS. They have full-time jobs of their own and participate in the program in their free time because they enjoy contact with young people like yourself.

Since they are unpaid and busy, CIPE recommends that you approach External Advisers just as you would a professional who has no affiliation with the College: keep your communications concise; offer to meet at a time and place that’s convenient for them; propose a short meeting, such as 30 minutes; and complete any preparatory work they suggest. If you have questions about how to go conduct informational interviews, review our whiteboard video or ask your CIPE adviser.

What should I wear to meetings with External Advisers?

What constitutes “proper” dress depends on context. Your clothing is a tool to help you accomplish your goals, and unless your goals are related to fashion, a reasonable goal for almost all informational meetings is to wear something that is so well adapted to the meeting context that the other person doesn’t notice what you are wearing. An easy rule of thumb is to wear what the other person is wearing.

Rather than promulgating hard and fast rules, CIPE recommends that you develop a process of inquiry. What will the adviser likely be wearing? Where is the meeting? What do other people usually wear at that venue?

T-shirts, shorts, and sandals are not typically seen in the workplaces of our external advisers, and for this reason are best avoided in informational meetings with them.

I’ve had a first meeting, and it went well.  What next?

Congratulations! First, send a thank-you note to the adviser; they donated valuable time to your personal and professional growth. Next, send a quick note to your CIPE adviser to update us as well.

Good advising meetings often yield “due-outs” or “homework” for the advisee. If your adviser recommended reading, research, reflection, or other tasks, be sure you commit to these and follow up with the adviser when you have completed the work. You won’t receive a grade for this work, and you won’t be paid—but then, neither was the adviser!

If the adviser makes an introduction, be sure to treat that person respectfully as well.

Also consider what you learned about the adviser. Although they are accomplished professionals themselves, with busy schedules and well-developed networks, they might be interested in campus happenings or introductions you can make. At a minimum, you should have learned enough about them to know how they manage their schedule and communications, and what you can do to make a possible future meeting easier.

I’ve had a meeting which didn’t go well.  What next?

Everyone has a bad meeting now and then, and CIPE and our external advisers know this. two important considerations:

  • Even if you think you got nothing out of the meeting, you still owe the adviser a thank-you note; they did donate their time to your personal and professional growth.
  • Reflect on why the meeting didn’t go well. What were your expectations? How about the adviser’s expectations? Did problems arise out of mechanics (e.g., when and where the meeting occurred)? …or from content (what was said)?
  • Let your CIPE adviser know how you felt the meeting went.
  • Be open to feedback, both from the adviser and from CIPE.

For Advisers

Thank you for your support!  As an External Adviser, you have the opportunity to inspire young people who share your interests and values.  Here are some answers to common questions about the program:

I want to help, but I’m very busy. How can I manage the time commitment?

Your time is valuable, and both the College and our students respect that.

As a member of the External Adviser Program, you are a volunteer: you are free to modulate your time according to other demands on your schedule and whatever seasonality affects your work.

For your background, Yale-NUS students are on break from May-July and again during the month of December; during these windows, demand will fall as students depart Singapore on travel, internships, or study abroad. During the early weeks of each semester—August/September and January/February each year—students have more free time and are more likely to seek your advice and assistance.

If you find that students are requesting more time than you have, feel free to communicate this directly to them, or to the EAP coordinator, Paul Wilt (paul.wilt@yale-nus.edu.sg). As with your personal mentoring activities, you should not feel obligated to take more meetings than you can accommodate.

Students are seeking help I can’t give.

One of the program’s goals is to teach students that different people have different scopes of expertise. If the student is simply asking questions beyond your domain of experience, you can just let them know.

If students are seeking help beyond what you’re comfortable giving—for instance, requesting introductions or support for a job application which you’re not in a position to make—please also provide this feedback to CIPE (paul.wilt@yale-nus.edu.sg), so we can adjust our training programs accordingly.

I have feedback about a student.

We believe that soliciting and integrating feedback is a critical part of the personal growth process, and we aim to teach those skills in part through this program. You should find our students intent on improving their relationship with you, as well as their overall ability to create and maintain professional relationships in general. When you see opportunities for improvement, feel free to communicate them directly to the student, or EAP Coordinator Paul Wilt (paul.wilt@yale-nus.edu.sg).

I have feedback about the program.

CIPE is very interested in feedback about the External Adviser Program, and committed to making the program a positive experience for all involved. Contact EAP Coordinator Paul Wilt (paul.wilt@yale-nus.edu.sg) to discuss your thoughts.

For Yale-NUS Faculty and Staff

For Faculty

CIPE’s External Adviser program engages professionals from the Singapore community as career advisers and mentors to students. These professionals can provide a range of perspectives and experience far broader than what the College could develop internally.

If you are advising a student whose interests are outside the scope of your own experience, consider encouraging the student to take advantage of the External Adviser Program. Students can see adviser profiles and can consult with their CIPE adviser about how to approach and secure the support of an external adviser.

If one of your professional or social contacts is interested in getting more involved with the College, consider referring them to CIPE (paul.wilt@yale-nus.edu.sg) as an external adviser.  External advisers are not paid, but like most of us, they find it rewarding to mentor young people. Thank you for your support.